Why Mindfulness Matters—and Why It Might Matter to You!

According to a report released by the American Psychiatric Association in May 2018, levels of anxiety among American adults have exploded in the last two years. Between 2017 and 2018 alone, the APA noted a five percent increase in anxious behaviors.

But what’s driving this flare-up of anxious people, and how can we deal with it?

“At this particular juncture in time, there’s a real sense of uncertainty about where humanity is going,” says Jon Kabat-Zinn, cofounder of the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Clinic at the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

After 40 years of treating stress disorders with mindfulness-based techniques, he is a premier authority on this increasingly pressing subject.

In the following FREE video, “Why Mindfulness Matters—and Why It Might Matter to You!” Jon explains his techniques and how they can help you deal more skillfully with a rapidly changing world:

How Living in the Present Moment Can Change Your Life

How present are you right now? Are you really here? Or is your mind off somewhere else, caught up in thinking and emotions, the past and the future, without being fully aware of that fact? It is all too easy to live focused on the next item on our never-ending to-do list, hoping to get it checked off and feel good for however long that feeling will last. But when, if ever, do we allow ourselves to simply drop into the present moment as it is—to practice residing in awareness, in the domain of being, or if you will, in the domain of “non-doing”? This rotation in consciousness can catalyze an entirely different way of being and acting in the world.

The miracle of mindfulness is that it reconnects us to the inherent richness of life inwardly and outwardly—a richness of embodied wakefulness and possibilities that can only be found and inhabited in this timeless moment we call “now.”


ABOUT JON KABAT-ZINN
Jon Kabat-Zinn, PhD, is a Professor of Medicine Emeritus at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, where he founded the world-renowned MBSR (Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction) Clinic in 1979. He also founded the medical school’s Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, Health Care, and Society. He is the author of 14 books in print in over 40 languages, including the bestsellers Full Catastrophe Living; Wherever You Go, There You Are; Coming to Our Senses; and Mindfulness for Beginners. His work has contributed to a growing movement of mindfulness into mainstream institutions such as medicine, psychology, health care, neuroscience, K-12 schools, higher education, business, social justice, criminal justice, prisons, the law, technology, government, and professional sports.



Sounds True was founded in 1985 by Tami Simon with a clear mission: to disseminate spiritual wisdom.

In more than three decades of growth, change, and evolution, Sounds True has maintained its focus on its overriding purpose, as summed up in our Mission Statement: To Wake Up the World



Share and Enjoy !

0Shares
0 0 0

What Really Matters

At the end of our lives, what do we most wish for? For many, it’s simply comfort, respect, love. BJ Miller is a hospice and palliative medicine physician who thinks deeply about how to create a dignified, graceful end of life for his patients. Take the time to savor this moving talk, which asks big questions about how we think on death and honor life.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

BJ Miller · Palliative care physician
Using empathy and a clear-eyed view of mortality, BJ Miller shines a light on healthcare’s most ignored facet: preparing for death.


Excerpts:

For most people, the scariest thing about death isn’t being dead, it’s dying, suffering. It’s a key distinction.

We know from research what’s most important to people who are closer to death: comfort; feeling unburdened and unburdening to those they love; existential peace; and a sense of wonderment and spirituality.

So much of life comes down to loving our time by way of the senses, by way of the body — the very thing doing the living and the dying.

As long as we have our senses — even just one — we have at least the possibility of accessing what makes us feel human, connected.

So, if teasing unnecessary suffering out of the system was our first design cue, then tending to dignity by way of the senses, by way of the body — the aesthetic realm — is design cue number two. Now this gets us quickly to the third and final bit for today; namely, we need to lift our sights, to set our sights on well-being, so that life and health and healthcare can become about making life more wonderful, rather than just less horrible.

Here, this gets right at the distinction between a disease-centered and a patient- or human-centered model of care, and here is where caring becomes a creative, generative, even playful act. “Play” may sound like a funny word here. But it is also one of our highest forms of adaptation. Consider every major compulsory effort it takes to be human. The need for food has birthed cuisine. The need for shelter has given rise to architecture. The need for cover, fashion. And for being subjected to the clock, well, we invented music. So, since dying is a necessary part of life, what might we create with this fact? By “play” I am in no way suggesting we take a light approach to dying or that we mandate any particular way of dying. There are mountains of sorrow that cannot move, and one way or another, we will all kneel there. Rather, I am asking that we make space — physical, psychic room, to allow life to play itself all the way out — so that rather than just getting out of the way, aging and dying can become a process of crescendo through to the end. We can’t solve for death.

We can design towards it. Parts of me died early on, and that’s something we can all say one way or another. I got to redesign my life around this fact, and I tell you it has been a liberation to realize you can always find a shock of beauty or meaning in what life you have left, like that snowball lasting for a perfect moment, all the while melting away. If we love such moments ferociously, then maybe we can learn to live well — not in spite of death, but because of it. Let death be what takes us, not lack of imagination.


Sounds True was founded in 1985 by Tami Simon with a clear mission: to disseminate spiritual wisdom.

In more than three decades of growth, change, and evolution, Sounds True has maintained its focus on its overriding purpose, as summed up in our Mission Statement: To Wake Up the World


Access Consciousness offers pragmatic tools to change things in your life that you haven’t been able to change until now.

The aim of Access is to create a world of consciousness and oneness, where everything exists and nothing is judged. Are you ready to expand the level of choices and possibilities that are available to you?


The Shift Network aim’s to create a sustainable, peaceful, healthy and prosperous world.

We hold a vision where, not only are everyone’s basic needs met while living in peace, but the very best in all of us is expressed and humanity’s full creative potential is set free.

Our intention is to share the very best in personal and societal transformation, so that together, step by step, we’re shifting the way we do things on this planet and creating a beautiful world that works for all.

A network of inspired hearts, awakened minds, and dedicated souls.


Philosophy: We’re passionate about transforming people’s lives, educating and empowering them on how to live more healthily through the power of nature.
Vision: To be a world leader of natural health and beauty, enabling people to live more healthily.
Mission:To improve the quality of people’s lives by sharing our expertise and encouraging a more natural, holistic way of health, beauty, and well-being.

Share and Enjoy !

0Shares
0 0 0